< Back to Quick Quiz Listing

The quiz questions are often taken from:

The online learning pages focus on the important topics within worms, flies and lice and offer two approaches to learning: structured reading and question and answer.

We also welcome suggested questions for the quiz, (either reply on the ParaBoss News email if you are subscribed or use Contact Us, at the bottom of the web page).

Answers and links to further information are provided below the image.

Questions

1. Under what conditions do significant numbers of scour worm eggs develop to infective larvae?

2. After what age can scoring for fleece rot be done, and with what minimum growth (months) of wool?

3. When dipping ewes for lice before lambing, how many weeks before lambing should dipping ideally take place and why that time?

4. Under what conditions are goats most likely to exhibit illness from coccidiosis?


Answers

1. Under what conditions do significant numbers of scour worm eggs develop to infective larvae?

Temperature: daily maximum >15°C for T. colubriformis or >12°C for T. vitrinus
Moisture in this time: >10–15 mm rainfall

2. After what age can scoring for fleece rot be done, and with what minimum growth (months) wool?

Sheep can be scored for fleece rot from 9 months of age. Scoring can be done at classing or shearing, provided there is a minimum of 6 months (or 40 mm) of wool growth to assess.

3. When dipping ewes for lice before lambing, how many weeks before lambing should dipping ideally take place and why that time?

If dipping is contemplated prior to lambing, it is best carried out at least 6 weeks before lambing because it lessens the stress and health consequences from shearing and dipping late pregnant ewes, however as dipping can kill lice in days, it is useful when ewes will lamb within the next 6 weeks.

4. Under what conditions are goats most likely to exhibit illness from coccidiosis?

Several species of Eimeria affect goats. These parasites are usually acquired in the first few months of life and small numbers are carried by most young animals, usually causing no ill-effects. However, with stress and overcrowding, particularly under damp unhygienic conditions, disease may occur. It is most commonly seen in young stock just before weaning, or in kids, or when goats are in feedlots, and other situations where stock are confined at very high stocking rates. Coccidiosis in young animals is usually associated with very cold conditions and poor pasture nutrition resulting in a reduced milk supply from the doe, and forcing the kids to graze close to the ground.