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ParaBoss News - January 2019 - Feature Articles

Just because it's droughty, don't forget fluke.
Just because it's droughty, don't forget fluke.
Where will your wool end up?
Where will your wool end up?
Hand jetting is a good method of suppressing lice in long wool. Source: Coopers Fly and Lice, Coopers Animal Health.
Hand jetting is a good method of suppressing lice in long wool. Source: Coopers Fly and Lice, Coopers Animal Health.
Provide browse for goats to reduce worm infections. Source: Ingrid Pullen
Provide browse for goats to reduce worm infections. Source: Ingrid Pullen


Fast Fact

Wolbachia—a bacterial force for good!

In a world–first trial, mosquitoes, rendered incapable of transmitting Dengue Fever by a bacteria called Wolbachia, were successfully released onto tropical areas of coastal Queensland where Dengue outbreaks often occur. Male mosquitoes made sterile by Wolbachia have also been released in the same area in an attempt to completely eradicate mosquito populations from the urban landscape.

Wolbachia are naturally occurring bacteria that parasitise many insects, and some nematodes, but not mammals, reptiles, birds or fish. 

Feature articles

Again this month our feature article blurbs have been written by Dr Paul Nilon, a sheep veterinary consultant and our Tassie correspondent, who is also a member of the ParaBoss Technical Committee. It would be good to have your feedback on this new format—just reply to this email and let us know your thoughts.

Just because it’s droughty, don’t forget fluke.

from the WormBoss web site, introduction by Paul Nilon

Because fluke depend on snails associated with springs or slow-moving water they fall from people’s radar when it’s dry. This is a mistake, as dry conditions sometimes concentrate grazing around springs and waterways. Moreover, unlike intestinal worms, fluke may survive for years in a wide variety of hosts (not just sheep). So, when the season changes there can be a quick turnaround in fluke status. The full life cycle of fluke is on WormBoss, or have a look at the NSW Prime Fact. Sorry, West Australians, you only need to do it as a learning exercise. >> Read More.

Where will your wool end up?

from the FlyBoss web site, introduction by Paul Nilon

Although China dominates wool sales, a surprising amount of wool is going to European manufacturers that are very aware of environmental concerns surrounding processing and animal welfare at home in Australia. A previous feature article outlined European Ecolabel requirements. However, this is a blunt tool, and individual processors and manufacturers may impose additional requirements. A recent inquiry to the author from the German manufacturer Ortovox highlighted this. So, to give yourself the best chance of being compliant for all possible markets, adopt a low residue approach from the start. Critical elements include:

  • Have a fly management (and lice biosecurity) plan.
  • If treating close to shearing, be aware of the Wool Handling Interval (WHI) and additional requirements of potential customers.
  • Separate treated and non-treated wool. If shearing purchased sheep, separate their wool or use the sheep health statement to determine recent treatments.
  • Use the Residue Tool to determine the best chemical option.
  • Talk with your agent, or better still potential customers, see what may be required. >> Read More. 

Jetting in long wool for a knockdown, it’s easy, isn’t it?

from the LiceBoss web site, introduction by Paul Nilon

The rationale for long-wool treatment is described here, and the decision making is aided by the Long Wool Lice Tool. If you need/decide to treat, hand jetting is a good, cost-effective option, provided it’s done diligently. A few things to consider:

  • There are spinosyns, mectins and insect growth regulators (IGRs) registered for long wool treatments, but in reality, IGRs have limited viability because of ongoing wool damage while the lice die, and widespread resistance. The choice between spinosyns and mectins may come down to wool harvesting intervals versus cost. There are no chemicals suitable for use through jetting races.
  • Your pump needs to deliver 700 kiloPascals (kPa) at the device.
  • Crook or sickle wands or the Dutjet are both OK, but the Dutjet requires less effort to use.
  • Apply an appropriate amount of chemical (0.5 litre/month of wool growth).
  • Be aware of the OHS considerations.
  • A follow-up treatment off shears will still be required to achieve eradication. >> Read More.

The trouble with goats is their extraordinary capacity to promote anthelmintic resistance.

from the WormBoss web site, introduction by Paul Nilon

Goats’ susceptibility to worms, the way they metabolise many drenches, and the limited array of available registered drenches mean that resistance develops quickly to many compounds. The principles of resistance management in goats are similar to sheep. The WormBoss site has recommendations for resistance management in goats. The most important points are:


For January 2019 state outlooks, please follow the links below:

New South Wales
Victoria
Queensland
Western Australia
Tasmania
South Australia