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Australia's resource for control of worms, flies and lice in sheep,
and worms in goats

Alert: Rain/flooding increases 'Epi' risk

Rain and flooding in the eastern states will result in hordes of mosquitoes as the temperatures rise. Mossies can spread a bacteria that causes the disease Eperythrozoonosis—it might look like barber's pole worm, but your response should be very different. >>Read more.

The quick quiz

This 3-question quick quiz tests your knowledge of sheep parasites and their control. 

1. Will worm resistant sheep reduce the level of worm contamination on pastures?

2. Can spray-ons also be used to treat struck sheep?

3. Describe two ways of applying a backline product that help to ensure it is applied evenly and in the correct position on the sheep.

>> Answers to the quiz.

State Outlooks for September 2016

Rain over much of the country and following on from good falls of rain during winter has produced conditions suitable for worms and fly. For most it will be a bumper spring, so monitor each month for worms, flies, and liver fluke (where liver fluke snails occur).


Anaemia: is it barbers pole worm or Epi (or both)?
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New South Wales
>> full report

Wet weather will bring higher challenges for both worms and flies. Prepare low worm-risk weaning paddocks to avoid disasters with barber's pole worms and monitor regularly for worms and flies.

Victoria
>> full report

Keep the drench guns ready, but monitor frequently, for both worms and flies.

Queensland
>> full report

Avoid weaner deaths from worms by preparing low worm-risk weaner paddocks from when lambing starts.

Western Australia
>> full report

Worm burdens and their effects are generally low from now until well into autumn, and it's an opportunity to avoid giving a drench.

Tasmania
>> full report

For most producers the next issue is the weaning drench.

South Australia
>> full report

Recent counts WormTests indicate the need for a drench in most circumstances.