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Quick quiz: 2015 June

The quiz questions are taken from:

The online learning pages focus on the important topics within worms, flies and lice and offer two approaches to learning: structured reading and question and answer.

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Answers and links to further information are provided below the image.

Questions

1. How long do infective larvae of worms live?

2. Are there particular paddocks or areas where flystrike occurs more often?

3. How can the development of resistance of lice to treatments be slowed?


Let's not forget those who are still in drought.


 


1. How long do infective larvae of worms live?

Infective larvae are relatively tough and can withstand dry, cold and moderately hot conditions. All populations of living things vary in their life expectancy and worms are no different; some larvae will die within days, but some will live to around a year or more. Generally, over 90% of larvae will be dead within 6 months under cooler conditions and as little as 3 months when temperatures are ideal (about 25–30°C). Under extremely hot, dry conditions larvae will be desiccated and can die in a few days to weeks of these conditions, explaining why worms are rarely a problem in the arid zone.

2. Are there particular paddocks or areas where flystrike occurs more often?

In general, paddocks that are more exposed to wind, with less ground cover, timber and wet spots, will have less flystrike risk , making them more suitable for high risk mobs of sheep, such as marked lambs, daggy sheep and lambing ewes.

3. How can the development of resistance of lice to treatments be slowed?

  • Make sure the dose rate is correct
  • Apply chemicals strictly according to label directions
  • Don’t expose treated sheep to untreated lousy sheep
  • Rotate products from different chemical groups
  • Consider flystrike chemicals
  • Avoid using long wool treatments where possible
  • Where a long wool treatment has been used, ensure that a chemical from a different group is used after the next shearing