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Questions

1. On properties where liver fluke occurs, when is the most important time of the year to treat for liver fluke?

2. With flystrike management, what do visual sheep score assessments help you to do?

3. What are the four key components of a successful lice biosecurity plan?


Answers

1. On properties where liver fluke occurs, when is the most important time of the year to treat for liver fluke?

The most important treatment is carried out in April–May and should be based on the flukicide, triclabendazole, which is effective against all stages of the fluke found in the sheep. If treatments are also required in August–September and/or February, one or both of these treatments should be a flukicide other than triclabendazole (if this was used in April). This treatment rotation will reduce the rate of development of fluke resistant to triclabendazole.

2. With flystrike management, what do visual sheep score assessments help you to do?

Visual scoring provides an assessment of the susceptibility of the flock for both breech and body strike.

With this information you can;

  • develop a breeding objective to improve traits in the future
  • develop a selection strategy to implement the breeding objective
  • develop a management strategy to control flystrike

3. What are the four key components of a successful lice biosecurity plan?

  • Commitment to preventing lice being introduced
  • Understand lice biology and how lice spread
  • Recognition that all introduced sheep present a possible risk of introducing lice
  • Awareness that communication within the local community assists lice biosecurity