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Questions

1. Should lambs be regularly treated for intestinal tapeworm?

2. How are power-assisted applicators useful when applying flystrike prevention products?

3. What are the key ways to produce low residue wool?


Answers

1. Should lambs be regularly treated for intestinal tapeworm?

While tapeworms are large and the segments passing in the dung are very obvious, there is no consistent evidence that they cause production loss or ill-health. Therefore, treatment for tapeworms is not warranted.

Intestinal tapeworms (Moniezia) are blamed for a range of sheep problems, but there is no hard evidence for any effects on production or health. Treating specifically for intestinal tapeworm is unlikely to be beneficial, whether in terms of scouring or weight gains. It is more important to effectively treat the less visible worms (the important sheep roundworms), which can cause severe production losses and death.

2. How are power-assisted applicators useful when applying flystrike prevention products?

Many of these products can be applied using power-assisted (compressed air or LPG gas cylinder) applicators. This assists with consistent delivery of the selected dose, ensures rapid and reliable refilling of the gun and reduces operator fatigue. For smaller flocks the simple manual squeeze type applicators available offer a cheap and easily portable means of application. It is essential that only applicators approved for particular products are used and calibrated according to directions for the product of choice, before being used on the sheep.

3. What are the key ways to produce low residue wool?

  • Reduce the need for flystrike chemicals by implementing an integrated control program for flystrike with increased reliance on non-chemical methods
  • Implement a lice biosecurity program to prevent the introduction of lice on strays or purchased sheep and treat only when lice are found.
  • If jetting for protection from flystrike close to shearing or when only a short period of protection is needed, use a chemical with a short residual period,
  • Jet only the most susceptible mobs and only the most susceptible areas,
  • If sheep are purchased without a declaration regarding any previous treatment then their wool should be kept separate at shearing.
  • Wool from sheep that are struck and treated individually should be kept separate at shearing.
  • If lice are found in long wool, consult the Long Wool Tool to determine if a long wool treatment is necessary and which chemicals to use.