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Quick quiz: May 2016

The quiz questions are taken from:

The online learning pages focus on the important topics within worms, flies and lice and offer two approaches to learning: structured reading and question and answer.

We also welcome suggested questions for the quiz, (either reply on the ParaBoss News email if you are subscribed or use Contact Us, at the bottom of the web page).

Answers and links to further information are provided below the image.

Questions

1. How often should a DrenchTest be carried out on a property?

2. How does completing the National Wool Declaration (when you sell wool) help industry?

3. How do you go about checking each sheep for lice?


The frosts have started
The frosts have started

Answers

1. How often should a DrenchTest be carried out on a property?

A DrenchTest is used to assess the effectiveness of a number of drenches that you might use on your property in the next 2–3 years. The DrenchTest:

  • Examines each drench’s effectiveness for each worm type present.
  • Is the most accurate way to test for drench resistance.
  • Uses the procedure called a Worm Egg Count Reduction Test or WECRT
  • Should be conducted on each property every 2–3 years.

2. How does completing the National Wool Declaration (when you sell wool) help industry?

The information that you declare in the National Wool Declaration is translated into codes that appear on the wool sale catalogues and certificates. The information is vital in providing transparency to the wool supply chain about management practices in the Australian sheep industry.

3. How do you go about checking each sheep for lice?

  • Lay the sheep on its side in a well-lit position, part the wool and look for lice.
  • If you need glasses to read the telephone book, make sure you use your glasses when looking for lice. A magnifying glass can help.
  • Check at least 20 wool partings on any rubbed sheep; partings should be at least 10 cm long. The more sheep you inspect, the more chance you have of finding lice if they are present.
  • Once you have found one live louse you can stop; there will be many more lice that you can’t find. All sheep should be treated after the next shearing.