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Questions

1. What are the two newest drench groups?

2. Is dipping a suitable method to apply flystrike products for strike prevention, strike treatment, both or neither?

3. Are there any lice treatment chemicals that are 100% effective?

4. When choosing a drench for your goats, which principle is generally the most important: using a combination drench (which has two to four different actives in it) or rotating the drench (which uses a different drench group than last time)?


Answers

1. What are the two newest drench groups?

  • The AD (Amino-acetonitrile Derivative) group, which contains Monepantel (in Zolvix and Zolvix Plus)
  • The SI (SpiroIndole ) group, which contains derquantel (in Startect)

Because they have been in use a much shorter time than older drench groups, there are very few reports of drench-resistance. Use WormBoss recommendations to manage resistance to keep these drenches useful on your farm for many years to come.

2. Is dipping a suitable method to apply flystrike products for strike prevention, strike treatment, both or neither?

Using a dip to apply flystrike treatments is generally not advisable, whether for prevention or treatment of strike.

Cyromazine—the only flystrike chemical registered for use in dips—is suited to prevention rather than treatment of strikes.

However, preventative treatments are best applied when there is a high flystrike risk—that's usually on longer wool. 

Since sheep have been bred to resist rain penetrating the fleece, the dip fluid, likewise, does not penetrate the fleece sufficiently to provide good protection. These types of treatments are not formulated to provide good effect from a surface application (like pour-on or spray-on treatments) and are best applied by jetting into the fleece.

3. Are there any lice treatment chemicals that are 100% effective?

Yes. Resistance of lice is extremely rare or non-existent to these 5 chemical groups (and their actives).

  • Neonicotinoid (Imidacloprid, thiacloprid)
  • Spinosyn (Spinosad)
  • Organophosphate (OP: temephos, diazinon)
  • Macrocyclic lactone (ML: abamectin, ivermectin)
  • Magnesium fluorosilicate/sulphur (MgFSi, sulphur, rotenone)

If lice remain despite a treatment (they may only be suppressed and become evident again in a few months or so) then it is most likely that the application method or mustering is at fault and/or not all sheep were properly treated.

4. When choosing a drench for your goats, which principle is generally the most important: using a combination drench (which has two to four different actives in it) or rotating the drench (which uses a different drench group than last time)?

Rotation between different drench groups does not play a significant role in slowing the development of drench resistance. The three principles for choosing drenches to slow the development of drench resistance are:

  • Use drenches most effective on your property. Drenches that reduce worm egg count by at least 98% are preferred.
  • Use an effective combination of two or more drench groups, either in a multi-active product or using more than one product concurrently (up the race with one and then the other) to combine different drench groups. The higher the efficacy of each drench group and the more drench groups included in the combination, the greater the benefit for slowing drench resistance.
  • Use short-acting treatments and restrict the use of persistent products for specific purposes and high worm-risk times of year.

NOTE: There are no combination drenches registered for goats, therfore this is an off-label use and must be used under a prescription from your veterinarian.