< Back to Quick Quiz Listing

The quiz questions are taken from:

The online learning pages focus on the important topics within worms, flies and lice and offer two approaches to learning: structured reading and question and answer.

We also welcome suggested questions for the quiz, (either reply on the ParaBoss News email if you are subscribed or use Contact Us, at the bottom of the web page).

Answers and links to further information are provided below the image.

Questions

1. In temperate winter rainfall areas, when is a first summer drench typically given?

2. What are important steps to take when considering ceasing mulesing?

3. Can new lice infestations in sheep come from goats or birds?

4. What are the key benefits from treating goats with combination drenches?


Don't just stop mulesing, make sure you, your staff and your flock are ready.
Don't just stop mulesing, make sure you, your staff and your flock are ready.

Answers

1. In temperate winter rainfall areas, when is a first summer drench typically given?

The first summer drench is generally given to all sheep and goat mobs once the pastures are haying off, usually in November or early December. Weaning of spring-born lambs and kids usually coincides with the first summer drench and all lambs and kids should be drenched at this time.

2. What are important steps to take when considering ceasing mulesing?

10 steps to a ceased-mulesing flock

  1. Identify the flystrike risk periods on your property
  2. Assess the flystrike susceptibility of your current sheep
  3. Identify your new ideal sheep and have the conviction to breed them
  4. Identify new or modified practices that could be used
  5. Review whether you and your team have what it takes
  6. Learn what you might need
  7. Surround yourself with support
  8. Be prepared and flexible
  9. Take the plunge, but keep your eye on the ball
  10. Review, improve and rejoice

3. Can new lice infestations in sheep come from goats or birds?

Sheep lice do not breed on animals other than sheep (with the possible exception of goats, in very rare instances). Birds do not carry sheep lice and they do not remain in wool rubbed onto fences, trees or other structures, so these are not sources of infestation.

4. What are the key benefits from treating goats with combination drenches?

Combining actives can substantially slow the development of drench resistance to those actives on your farm, allowing you more drench choices for more years.

On many farms a combination is likely to be more effective than using the individual actives (unless the individual active is fully effective). This will give a better kill of the worms in your animals.