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2020 September

The quiz questions are taken from:

The online learning pages focus on the important topics within worms, flies and lice and offer two approaches to learning: structured reading and question and answer.

We also welcome suggested questions for the quiz, (either reply on the ParaBoss News email if you are subscribed or use Contact Us, at the bottom of the web page).

Answers and links to further information are provided below the image.

Questions

  1. What’s the minimum time between an effective drench and sheep re-infecting pasture?

  2. How often should existing sheep on a property be checked for lice?

  3. What are the two main reasons why you should remove fly struck sheep from the mob?

  4. What do you need to consider if you’re planning to use sheep drenches on goats?

The range of products registered with the APVMA for treating goats is much smaller than those for sheep.
The range of products registered with the APVMA for treating goats is much smaller than those for sheep.
Question 1. What’s the minimum time between an effective drench and sheep re-infecting pasture?

Worm larvae eaten by sheep or goats soon after an effective drench will take at least 18 days before they can lay eggs. During this period after administering an effective drench sheep or goats are not re-infecting the pasture.

http://www.wormboss.com.au/sheep-goats/tests-tools/management-tools/grazing-management/paddock-contamination-with-worms.php

Question 2. How often should existing sheep on a property be checked for lice?

All mobs should be checked for lice at least twice each year.

Useful opportunities for monitoring are when sheep are yarded for drenching, crutching, marking and shearing or other management procedures. Any sheep seen with rubbed fleece or pulled wool should be checked as a matter of urgency. It is also a good idea to ask your shearers and shed hands to look out for lice at shearing.

http://www.liceboss.com.au/sheep-goats/about-lice/liceboss-online-learning/checking-for-lice.php

Question 3. What are the two main reasons why you should remove fly struck sheep from the mob?

Leaving struck sheep in the mob attracts more blowflies.

2. Moving struck sheep to a ‘hospital’ paddock allows closer monitoring of recovery and reduces the risk to the rest of the mob.

http://www.flyboss.com.au/sheep-goats/treatment/treatment-of-struck-sheep.php

Question 4. What do you need to consider if you’re planning to use sheep drenches on goats?

The range of products registered with the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) for treating goats is much smaller than those for sheep. There are even fewer for dairy goats. If drenches are misused and result in chemical residues in goat meat and milk products that exceed the Maximum Residue Limits, Australia’s valuable goat-export markets can be jeopardised.

http://www.wormboss.com.au/sheep-goats/tests-tools/management-tools/drenches/drenches-for-goats-using-products-correctly-and-legally.php

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